PURE & DEDICATED CRAFTSMANSHIP

We put a lot of knowledge, time and love into our beers. As true ambassadors we want to share our stories about this complex and sophisticated product with you. Cheers to beer!

HISTORY OF BEER

Beer has been a vital part of our lives for 7,000 years. It was discovered by pure accident in Mesopotamia, the old Iraq. Nowadays, it is the 3rd most popular drink in the world, after water and tea. Each year, a total of 20 billion litres of beer is brewed, the equivalent of 8,000 Olympic swimming pools.

\

5000 BC

BREAD BEER The first beers, brewed using water and leavened bread, were sour to taste

\

3000BC

BEERAMIDS The slaves of Egypt that built the pyramids were given beer to drink and thereby lived longer

\

1000 BC

BEER LAW Beer blunderers  were drowned in their own vats by the Babylonians

\

800 BC

BREWING DRESSES Beer was brewed by women and monks, to provide for their own livelihoods

\

500 BC

VICTORY The Greeks and Romans first encountered beer on the battlefields

\

900

TAX MAN To avoid the taxes imposed on beer, hops was used in brewing

\

>1300

HIGH TIMES The consumption of beer was 450 litres per person per year; as a substitute for unsafe water

\

<1300

COMMERCE With the arrival of coffee, tea and strong liquor, only the tastiest beers survived

BREWING PROCESS

Beer is crafted using four basic ingredients: barley malt, hops, water and yeast. To create different flavour profiles, brewers can also use additions like wheat, corn, fruit, spices, rice and spices. From raw ingredients to delivery, the production of beer undergoes different steps: malting, brewing, fermenting and filtrating

The INGREDIENTS

barley

This ingredient is responsible for your beer’s colour, taste, aroma and the foam head. Barley produces a bready, toasted, caramel or roasted taste. Most of the time, it is malted before brewing, resulting in a lighter or darker barley malt, depending on the temperature when processed. The starch in barley in transformed into sugar during brewing.

Hops

This green plant is responsible for the bitter taste and the fruity, floral & spicy aroma of a beer. It also works as a conservative and is available as bitter hops and aroma hops. During the boiling, brewers often use a mix of different types of hops. Sometimes, extra hop is added after boiling. This is called dry hopping and results in a more intense hop aroma.

Water

On average, a beer consists of 90% water. The salts, minerals and hardness of the water all have an impact on the beer’s appearance, taste and aroma. Before we can start brewing, the water is filtered and excess iron is removed. Some brewers have their own water source deep in the ground. In total, 3.5 to 7 litres of water are used to produce 1 litre of beer.

Yeast

Yeast is a single cell organism that is very important for the beer’s taste. It gives beer the aromas of banana, rose, apple, aniseed, almonds, cloves and pepper. Yeast transforms malt-sugars into alcohol and carbonation, also called fermentation. Depending on the temperature, we distinguish bottom fermentation (5 to 12°C) and top fermentation (15 to 25°C).

The additions

Wheat

For a more refreshing and sour taste and a lighter mouth feel

Oats

For a milder taste and a smooth mouth feel

Rye

For a roasted, sour taste

Corn

For a softer, lighter taste and a stronger head

Honey

For a sweeter taste and higher alcohol content

Sugar

For a sweeter, more roasted taste and higher alcohol content

Fruit

For a sweeter and spicier taste, and a more fruity aroma

Vegetables

For a fresher, more hearty taste

Rice

For a more spicy, drier taste, more alcohol and a better head

Spices

For a more spicy taste

beer PRODUCTION

1. Malting

The barley is warmed and moistened causing it to sprout. This process is halted by drying the barley (the warmer the drying, the darker the barley malt).

2. Milling

Our supply of malted barley is stored in large malt silos. In gristmills, this malted barley will be ground into a substance called ‘grist’.

3. Mashing

The grist is mixed with hot brewing water and heated to different temperatures. The starch is converted into fermentable brewing sugars.

4. Lautering

the mash is pumped into the lauter tun, where the solid components (grains) are separated from the soluble components (the wort).

5. Boiling

The wort is boiled for about 60 minutes in the wort copper, while the hops are added. Their bitter and aromatic ingredients are dissolved in the wort.

6. Whirlpooling

The wort from the brew kettle is pumped into the whirlpool. The wort is set into rotation and liberated from the sediment particles.

7. Cooling

Subsequently, the wort has to be cooled quickly. Using a wort cooler, the temperature is brought down to a constant 8 degrees Celsius.

8. Fermenting

The cooled wort is pumped into fermentation tanks and yeast is added, causing the malt sugars to convert into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

9. Storing

The beer is stored for several weeks at 0°C. During this phase, the secondary fermentation and maturation of the beer takes place.

10. Filtration

The remaining sediment particles and yeast cells are removed, giving the beer a shiny clarity. The filtered beer is now ready for bottling.

1. MALTING

The barley is warmed and moistened causing it to sprout. This process is halted by drying the barley (the warmer the drying, the darker the barley malt).

2. MILLING

Our supply of malted barley is stored in large malt silos. In gristmills, this malted barley will be ground into a substance called ‘grist’.

3. MASHING

The grist is mixed with hot brewing water and heated to different temperatures. The starch is converted into fermentable brewing sugars.

4. LAUTERING

the mash is pumped into the lauter tun, where the solid components (grains) are separated from the soluble components (the wort).

5. BOILING

The wort is boiled for about 60 minutes in the wort copper, while the hops are added. Their bitter and aromatic ingredients are dissolved in the wort.

6. WHIRLPOOLING

The wort from the brew kettle is pumped into the whirlpool. The wort is set into rotation and liberated from the sediment particles.

7. COOLING

Subsequently, the wort has to be cooled quickly. Using a wort cooler, the temperature is brought down to a constant 8 degrees Celsius.

8. FERMENTING

The cooled wort is pumped into fermentation tanks and yeast is added, causing the malt sugars to convert into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

9. STORING

The beer is stored for several weeks at 0°C. During this phase, the secondary fermentation and maturation of the beer takes place.

10. FILTRATION

The remaining sediment particles and yeast cells are removed, giving the beer a shiny clarity. The filtered beer is now ready for bottling

Beer Styles

Do you know your lager from your ale? And your weissbier from your stout? With over 150 different beer styles in the world, there is a lot to choose from. Explore the most popular varieties we have listed below and learn more about their aroma, taste and bitterness. It will give you the opportunity to discover the similarities and differences.

LAGER

Aroma Clear, malty with hints of spicy hops
Taste Soft and malty
Mouth feel Light, accessible, with a refreshing finish
Type Bottom fermented
Colour Straw to gold
Alcohol 4.8% to 5.5%
Bitterness Medium
Serving 3°C
Our brands Oranjeboom Premium Lager, Royal Dutch Premium Lager, Royal Dutch Imperial, Weidmann Pilsener

LIGHT LAGER

Aroma Slight hints of grainy malt
Taste Soft and grainy
Mouth feel Very light, lots of fizz, crisp, super dry
Type Bottom fermented
Colour Straw to gold
Alcohol 3.2 to 4.2%
Bitterness Low
Serving 3°C
Our brands Oranjeboom Premium Light (coming soon), Royal Dutch Extra Smooth

WEISSBIER

Aroma Fruity and spicy, with hints of banana and cloves
Taste Lightly grainy, slightly hoppy and a bit of sour-sweetness of wheat
Mouth feel Full-bodied, creamy and round
Type Bottom fermented
Colour Pale golden to orange
Alcohol 4.8% to 5.5%
Bitterness Low
Serving 3°C
Our brands Weidmann Hefetrüb

AMBER ALE

Aroma Malty, spicy; hints of caramel and floral hops
Taste Caramel flavour, malty, hoppy
Mouth feel Very light, lots of fizz, crisp, super dry
Type Bottom fermented
Colour Amber
Alcohol 5.1% to 8.0%
Bitterness Low to medium
Serving 5-6°C
Our brands D’Oranjeboom Princesse Ale

INDIA PALE ALE

Aroma Hoppy, spicy, malty
Taste Malty, hoppy, with hints of caramel
Mouth feel Refreshing, dry body and a strong, hoppy aftertaste
Type Top fermented
Colour Pale gold to copper
Alcohol 4.8% to 7.5%
Bitterness High
Serving 5-6°C
Our brands Oranjeboom Crafted IPA (coming soon)

STOUT

Aroma Burnt, malty
Taste Creamy, burnt, sweet, with hints of caramel, bitter chocolate and hops
Mouth feel Complex, full, creamy, with a long aftertaste
Type Top fermented
Colour Dark brown to black
Alcohol 3.5% to 12.0%
Bitterness Low to medium
Serving 5-6°C
Our brands Trio Extra Stout, Trio Classic Stout, Trio Caramel Stout (coming soon)

WITBIER

Aroma Spicy, with subtle hints of orange and coriander
Taste Light and fruity, with a subtle citrus flavour
Mouth feel Refreshing with a soft finish
Type Top fermented
Colour Straw to pale yellow
Alcohol 4.2% to 5.5%
Bitterness Low
Serving 3°C
Our brands D’Oranjeboom Princesse Wit

ABBEY-STYLE BLOND

Aroma Fruity and spicy with hints of vanilla and cloves
Taste Soft, malty and sweet
Mouth feel Full-bodied and creamy with a long and warm aftertaste
Type Top fermented
Colour Gold
Alcohol 6.0% to 9.0%
Bitterness Low to medium
Serving 5-6°C
Our brands Monastère Blond

ABBEY-STYLE DOUBLE

Aroma Malty, spicy, fruity; with hints of cocoa, caramel and dried fruit
Taste Soft, round, spicy, sweet with hints of caramel
Mouth feel Full and creamy, with a long and warm aftertaste
Type Top fermented
Colour Dark brown
Alcohol 6.0% to 8.5%
Bitterness Low to medium
Serving 5-6°C
Our brands Monastère Double (coming soon)

ABBEY-STYLE TRIPLE

Aroma Spicy, fruity, malty and hoppy
Taste Complex, malty, fruity and spicy (pepper, coriander)
Mouth feel Full, soft, round aftertaste
Type Top fermented
Colour Gold
Alcohol 7.0% to 10.0%
Bitterness Low to medium
Serving 6-10°C
Our brands Monastère Triple (coming soon)

RADLER

Aroma Sweet, fruity (citrus)
Taste Fresh, soft, citrusy, balanced sweet
Mouth feel Soft, round body; refreshing and crisp finish
Type Bottom fermented
Colour Straw to gold
Alcohol 2.0% to 3.0%
Bitterness Low
Serving 3°C
Our brands Oranjeboom Premium Radler
, Weidmann Radler

CIDER

Aroma Fruity, floral
Taste Fruity, sweet
Mouth feel Refreshing, dry, crisp, light
Type Made by fermenting the juice of apples
Colour Gold to amber
Alcohol 3.5% to 12.0%
Bitterness Low
Serving 3°C
Our brands Oranjeboom Premium Cider

FOOD PAIRING

Beer is incredibly versatile: it can contain an infinite number of aromas and tastes. That’s why more and more people look for a beer to complement their food, instead of a wine. We have listed some basic rules and a few of the best combinations. Surprise your senses and discover that beer and food are a match made in heaven!

BASIC RULES

Fresh dishes with a light and crisp beer

Creamy dishes with a soft or a bitter beer

Steamed dishes with a soft and round beer

Spicy dishes with a fresh and malty beer

Grilled dishes with a roasted barley beer

Salted dishes with a roasted barley beer

Let's talk beer

Are you interested in selling our beers in your market? Leave your contact details and we will come back to you a.s.a.p.

United Dutch Breweries B.V.
Druivenstraat 21
4816 KB Breda, The Netherlands

P  +31 (0)76 578 10 00
 +31 (0)76 578 10 01
 @uniteddutchbreweries.com

| Social

Join our beer community

IFS broker united dutch breweries IFS logistics united dutch breweries

United Dutch Breweries B.V.
Druivenstraat 21
4816 KB Breda, The Netherlands

P  +31 (0)76 578 10 00
 +31 (0)76 578 10 01
 @uniteddutchbreweries.com